Music Genres 1/5107 or 5044 – Central Asian Folk

If you got roasted by the “How Bad was your Spotify” AI (try it here: https://pudding.cool/2020/12/judge-my-spotify/ ), you’ve probably asked yourself how you can disover other music genres so that you can broaden your music horizon. Well I found out about the Every Noise about a few weeka ago and it has 5,068 music genres on Spotify. By the time I checked on it todat, it was a 5,107. If you divide 5,107 by 365 days, that’s about 14 new music genres a day that you can discover.

What I do is plug-in the numbers 1 and 5107 into random.org and let the random number generator (RNG), work it’s magic. When I clicked “generate” it gave the number 5,044. You go to the original Every Noise list http://everynoise.com/everynoise1d.cgi?scope=all and find out what music genre, the number 5,044 corresponds to and in this case the music genre is “Central Asian Folk”. If you click on that link, it will reorder the list with “Central Asian Folk” at #1, relates musical genres to it from numbers #2 to #20 and at #5107 it’s “hard minimal techno” – which kind of makes sense to be at the other side of the music genre spectrum.

The list, http://everynoise.com/everynoise1d.cgi?root=central%20asian%20folk&scope=all conveniently has a Spotify that you can open and you can now sample a music genre that normal recommendation algorithms wouldn’t have otherwise suggested to you. Check it out here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6zZc6904zlMlWQqH16hjlx?si=X9VWbfMrTiKMOk0vHYOAqg and see which songs stand out.

I plan to take some notes on the rabbit holes I will get into via this method. Hopefully after a year, I would have sampled a much varied pallette of musical genres and it will hopefully leave me more open-minded. Some of my discoveries for this instance is the album Nauryz by the group Roksonaki https://open.spotify.com/album/1so7YgnkpNjdn99uCGci4n?si=K3ZTgvBtRpK1WSJrtgv4Ng and and also the album Arzu (Song of the Uyghurs) by Sanubar Tursun https://open.spotify.com/album/4mAufdX1k61TJ0X1lHojyf?si=wFyDPBUdRxWtw9rJOCM5-A who was supposed to go on tour but didn’t show up for reasons I won’t tackle on this post.

The ease in which one can fall into a rabbit hole is pleasantly surprising. If you just research the instruments they use and you end somewhere referencing Albert Kuvezin https://open.spotify.com/artist/2rMv2d9ermxwlNvZEYSWmA?si=Ru5Jn4Y8S2awQK8MJ0JB0A but one of the advantages of a reodered list presumably in way that maps its musical proximity to a music genre is that there are Spotify playlists you can jump into right after Central Asian Folk:

  • kazakh traditional
  • dombra
  • tajik traditional
  • uzbek traditional
  • jaw harp
  • kyrgyz traditional
  • vietnamese traditional
  • lao traditional
  • classical clarinet
  • yunnan traditional
  • cambodian traditional
  • samba-jazz
  • jazz brass
  • mountain dulcimer
  • swedish jazz

The good thing is that until swedish jazz, I have no idea what the other music genres would sound like except maybe for classical clarinet, samba-jazz and jazz brass. This will surely push me to the very limits of my music listening comfort but hopefully I will learn more about people, music and culture that’s all new to me. And yes, you do end up praying and interceding for the cultures behind these music genres because there’s nothing more visceral than listening to a new song from a new culture for the first time.

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